RESTORE

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Summary:
The Forgiveness Project has been running a prison programme in England and Wales since 2007. This work has been consolidated into RESTORE, our pioneering and award-winning, five-day course that comes under the Restorative Justice/Victim Awareness umbrella.

The Aim of RESTORE:
RESTORE’s broadest aim is to reduce the number of victims of crime through the rehabilitation of offenders. Aimed at adults and young people over 15 years of age, it is an intensive, group based intervention that encourages prisoners to explore concepts of forgiveness and reparation in a framework that fosters greater accountability and responsibility. The course is also appropriate for young people and adults on non-custodial sentences.

How RESTORE Works:
Our focus is on both victims and offenders taking responsibility for their own lives and on working out in the group what this signifies for each person. This is done in the context of story. Every course is co-facilitated by at least one ex-offender and a victim/survivor of serious crime. This ex-offender will normally have taken part in the workshop in prison prior to release. The use of victims’ stories provides the opportunity for prisoners to address the harm they have caused as well as exploring the relationship between themselves as victims and the victims of their crimes. The use of victims is key to establishing empathy and understanding in the group.

While a Restorative Justice face-to-face meeting may be the most effective way to help a victim receive answers and an apology, it isn’t always possible. RESTORE allows victims to receive related benefits by meeting and working alongside offenders, and helps prisoners address the harm they have caused as well as exploring the relationship between themselves as victims and the victims of their crimes.

Adaptions:
Our focus now is on expanding the reach of RESTORE, adapting the programme so it is relevant to a wide and diverse group of participants.

Longford Prize Winner:
In 2014 RESTORE was awarded the Longford Prize for “making a significant contribution to reducing reoffending as well as having a wider impact in creating a more positive commitment in our criminal justice system to restorative justice.”
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